avatar
Anthony Pure Silk Brightly
United Kingdom, London

About Anthony Pure Silk Brightly

It started from primary school, at the age of 9 my mum bought me an organ, and then I joined a band. Back in those days everything was very community based, in our area, there was bands, musicians etc. One day, a friend of mine who lived in our road said there’s a group starting off, (the Jackson 5 who were around those days). Everyone wanted to be the Jackson 5. The band needed an organists. We w ... read more

Members

Black Slate

A peaceful Demonstration is what we need. However this totally amazing album created by Black Slate is causing a Riot in the musical streets of the city of London where it all started some FORTY odd years ago; thus making Black Slate the first official Roots Rock Reggae Band out of “Great Britton” That’s right; gallantly forging forward in the name of music, every track on this album expresses a musical form in a unique story of the Good, the Better and the Best of Black Slate - the real deal. Standing the test of time, Black Slate has produced this memorable Master-Piece documenting their Global Years of Struggle, Toil, and Success in the ever-changing world of Reggae music. The mechanics and sheer driving force of this magnificent Band of Reggae Scientists are core members: Anthony ‘Pure Silk’ Brightly (Keyboards), Chris’Music House’ Hanson (Lead/Rhythm Guitar), Desmond ’Drummy’ Mahoney (Drums/Congo/Percussion). Alongside newer cohorts, Colin ’Steam Fish’ McNiesh (Bass) and Jessie ’Energy’ Brade (Vocals) as well as Gaven ‘Magic Voice’ Creary (Vocals) the newest member to this great idea that is BLACK SLATE. Totally inspired by vibes, tones, frequencies and a passion for Roots Rock Reggae music they travelled together to the beautiful beach surrounded Island of Antigua to record this their latest work of art….. A Peaceful Demonstration With the help of Solar energy - the most important source of energy for life on Earth provided by The Sun - they unified as one and presented us - their bonafide public - with a dish best served on a (turn)table and presented in a superb Track list of sound: Amon (See No Evil), Predator, Daylight, Should I Stay or Should I Go, Look into My Eyes, Can You Feel The Love, Peaceful Demonstration, Build Mamma Africa, I Can’t Breath, In the City, bonus track Thinking out Loud. Here we have eleven self-explanatory musical master-piece tracks which will prove without a shadow of a doubt who these very important components to the world and science of Roots Rock Reggae Music are. Listen out for them as they embark upon their second courageous World Tour:

Black Slate

Big Band
A peaceful Demonstration is what we need. However this totally amazing album created by Black Slate is causing a Riot in the musical streets of the city of London where it all started some FORTY odd ...

Black Slate Reggae Group

Black Slate is the roots rock Reggae band that helped put the British Reggae sound on the charts in the 70s and 80s. Formed in London in 1974 by musicians from England, Jamaica, and Anguilla, Black Slate was recognized as a band that was able to blend reggae into their own unique sound. Their first charting hit was “Sticksman,” released in 1976, followed by “Mind Your Motion” (TCD, 1979); “Amigo” (Ensign, 1980) broke into the Top Ten Singles Charts and, to this day, this song remains a rallying call for the Rastafarian way of life. Following a tour in Europe in 1978, and backing Reggae stars Delroy Wilson and Ken Boothe, Black Slate signed with Ensign Records and released “Boom Boom,” a single, and the Sirens In The City album. More albums followed – Rasta Festival (Alligator, 1981), Ogima (Hit and Run, 1981), Six Plus One (Top Ranking, 1982), Black Slate (Sierra, 1985), and Get Up And Dance (FairWood Music, 1995). After a sold-out tour of New Zealand, band members made the decision to stop touring in the mid 1980s and, in 2011, decided to begin the process of regrouping and planning Black Slate’s return to recording and performing again. In 2013, Black Slate released a full album, Midnight (TCD), and the single, “World Citizenship,” (Unit 8 Records). Remaining close friends over the years, original band members Anthony Brightly (keyboards and vocals), Chris Hanson (guitar), and Desmond Mahoney (drums) agreed to reunite and revitalize Black Slate. Adding Colin McNeish on bass guitar, F Junior and Jesse Brade on vocals, and Horace Burke on keyboards, the reunited Black Slate debuted at the prestigious Miami Reggae Festival in November 2013. Black Slate’s latest album, World Citizen (Unit 8 Records), was released on April 15, 2014. Veteran Reggae journalist Robert “Higherman” Heilman reviewed the album for Reggae-Vibes.com, and stated that, “From Roots to Lovers Rock, every track is a winner that is expertly mixed and presented.” (http://www.reggae-vibes.com/rev_sin/bls-worl.htm.) World Citizen will be supported by the band’s upcoming concerts in Europe, South America, the U.K., and the United States. Black Slate: a well respected band of talented and creative men who are again ready to bring their special brand of Reggae music to the world. “We play music because we love playing music. We are ready for the road again,” Anthony Brightly said recently. “A venue of 100, or a stadium of 10,000, we will be on the road, to carry our message to every person who want to hear Reggae music. I see it as a continuation of our journey…”

Black Slate Reggae Group

Reggae Band
Black Slate is the roots rock Reggae band that helped put the British Reggae sound on the charts in the 70s and 80s. Formed in London in 1974 by musicians from England, Jamaica, and Anguilla, Black Sl...

Black Slate Reggae Band

Black Slate Reggae Band

Reggae Band

About Anthony Pure Silk Brightly

It started from primary school, at the age of 9 my mum bought me an organ, and then I joined a band. Back in those days everything was very community based, in our area, there was bands, musicians etc. One day, a friend of mine who lived in our road said there’s a group starting off, (the Jackson 5 who were around those days). Everyone wanted to be the Jackson 5. The band needed an organists. We were all young at the time, the oldest was around 15. So with that we had a group called Mysteron 5. We did all the Motown stuff with a little reggae here and there. That lasted for about two years.

We used to have a local club called Phoebes and they were doing an “Opportunity Knocks” so every one in the area were saying you can win £20 and get a recording contracting. At the time, our house was the house that kept all the blues party, it was like a club. People would have weddings at our house so we had everything in the house, bands would rehearse, it was called ‘Queen B’ club. People used to just come. Alan Weeks he came, and I’d help him by playing the guitar. Then I got a message from Phoebes saying they’re looking for an organist, I was around 11 at the time, just getting ready to go to secondary school. From then on we became the house band and we used to back all the artists who entered the talent competition.

We were like the jukebox, we knew every single reggae songs. We were then called ‘Young Ones from Zion’. Outside of that I was doing my own little thing. In 1st & 2nd year at secondary school, I said I wanted to make a record.

On Kingsland High Rd, there used to be this studio and I used to walk past and all the time I’d say one day I’m going to make a record, little did I know it was actually a photograph studio; There were only one actual recording studio. I used to walk pass that and the reason was because I was really into football and Jimmy Greaves (well known footballer & subsequent commentator) had a shop in the area, in those days football players would have their own sports shop where you could buy the shirt and get the badge free.

One day I just went into the recording studio and said I want to make a record, how much will it cost? He said it will cost £10ph and you will need at least 3 hrs., I thought a record only play for 3.5mins but he explained to me what I had to do. I asked him what’s the quickest time I could make a record in, and he said maybe 1.5hrs. At 11 he must have been just humoring me because the studio door alone was so big I couldn’t even open it. My dad always made us work, he had a shop we always worked in the shop, at the blues parties we always worked, and that’s how I made the money – I saved up fifty pences until I had £15.00. Which made me able to book the studio. On the next road Keith Drummond and Ras Elroy Baily lived,

In school I had a friend who played the bass guitar so I said to Keith “You want to make a record”? He said yes, So I worked on his song, which was called ‘mixed up man’, I took him to the studio and recorded it. So my friend from school and myself took the time off from school.

I had told my music teacher, ‘I’m gonna make a record tomorrow’ and he also humored me and said ‘yeah alright’, so the next day me and Jeff came into school, and I said here is my record. He said ‘alright Anthony Brightly, let’s listen to your record’ in front of the whole class. They were all giggling, laughing.. I went and got the tape recorder, put it on, and played it, He said, ‘this is not your record? So got onto the piano and started playing along with it. He said, hold on a minute, took it to the Headmaster and they played it in assembly to the whole school. It was after that I joined the a band that later became Black Slate group.

Black Slate is the roots rock Reggae band that helped put the British Reggae sound on the charts in the 70s and 80s. Formed in London in 1974 by musicians from England, Jamaica, and Anguilla, Black Slate was recognized as a band that was able to blend reggae into their own unique sound. Their first charting hit was “Sticksman,” released in 1976, followed by “Mind Your Motion” (TCD, 1979); “Amigo” (Ensign, 1980) broke into the Top Ten Singles Charts and, to this day, this song remains a rallying call for the Rastafarian way of life.


Following a tour in Europe in 1978, and backing Reggae stars Delroy Wilson and Ken Boothe, Black Slate signed with Ensign Records and released “Boom Boom,” a single, and the Sirens In The City album. More albums followed – Rasta Festival (Alligator, 1981), Ogima (Hit and Run, 1981), Six Plus One (Top Ranking, 1982), Black Slate (Sierra, 1985), and Get Up And Dance (FairWood Music, 1995).

After a sold-out tour of New Zealand, band members made the decision to stop touring in the mid 1980s and, in 2011, decided to begin the process of regrouping and planning Black Slate’s return to recording and performing again. In 2013, Black Slate released a full album, Midnight (TCD), and the single, “World Citizenship,” (Unit 8 Records).

Remaining close friends over the years, original band members Anthony Brightly (keyboards and vocals), Chris Hanson (guitar), and Desmond Mahoney (drums) agreed to reunite and revitalize Black Slate. Adding Colin McNeish on bass guitar, F Junior and Jesse Brade on vocals, and Horace Burke on keyboards, the reunited Black Slate debuted at the prestigious Miami Reggae Festival in November 2013.

Black Slate’s latest album, World Citizen (Unit 8 Records), was released on April 15, 2014. Veteran Reggae journalist Robert “Higherman” Heilman reviewed the album for (expired link), and stated that, “From Roots to Lovers Rock, every track is a winner that is expertly mixed and presented.” ((expired link).) World Citizen will be supported by the band’s upcoming concerts in Europe, South America, the (expired link)., and the United States.

Black Slate: a well respected band of talented and creative men who are again ready to bring their special brand of Reggae music to the world.

“We play music because we love playing music. We are ready for the road again,” Anthony Brightly said recently. “A venue of 100, or a stadium of 10,000, we will be on the road, to carry our message to every person who want to hear Reggae music. I see it as a continuation of our journey…”

Anthony Pure Silk Brightly has no Merchandise yet.

(expired link)
BLACK SLATE
(VIBE EXPANTION)
How do you make three into twenty-four without maths, the answer is magic……!
The magic of vibes
Roots Rock Reggae vibes perfected by
Reggae Scientists
Black Slate

This was perfectly performed at
A Peace Demonstration
Held at Bibelot in Dordrecht,NL and the 4AD in Diksmuide BE.
Black Slate
And their roots rock reggae vibes expanded and fed their very tentative audience.
Totally captivated by this four peace big band sound
That’s how you do it……… with
A Peace Demonstration
If you have not experienced the Roots Rock Reggae Vibes conveyed with Black Slate Love,
Then that is your next mission
Should you choose to accept this mission to seek, experience and enjoy the beautifully delivered live sounds of
Black Slate
at
A Peace Demonstration
Near you,
You can do so at (expired link)
Where you can obtain the crucial tools of your listen trade the LP
A Peace Demonstration
Plus all the other tools you will need should you take this mission to seek…!
Black Slate
And
A Peace Demonstration
(Good Luck Enjoy…!)

Read more

A Peaceful Demonstration

A peaceful Demonstration is what we need, however this totally amazing album created by Black Slate is causing a Riot in the musical streets of the city of London where it all started from FORTY odd years ago; thus making Black Slate the first official Roots Rock Reggae Band out of Great Britton.
That’s right; gallantly forging forward in the name of roots rock reggae music, every track on this album expresses a musical form in a unique storey of the Good, the Better and the Best of Black Slate the real deal.

Standing the test of time Black Slate has produce this memorial Master Piece documenting their Global Years of Struggle, Toil, and Success in the ever changing world of reggae music.

The mechanics and share driving force core members of this magnificent Band of Reggae Scientists are:
Anthony-PureSilk-Brightly (keyboards), Chris-Musichouse-Hanson (Lead/Rhythm Guitar), Desmond-Drummy-Mahoney (Drums/Congo/Percussion).
Colin-Steam-Fish-McNiesh (Bass), Jessie-Energy Brade (vocals) and Lead Vocals Gaven Magic Voice Creary the newest member to this great idea BLACK SLATE.

Totally inspired by vibes, tones, frequencies and a passion for roots rock reggae music they travelled together to the beautiful beach surrounded Island of Antigua where they recorded their latest work of art A Peaceful Demonstration

With the help of Solar energy the most important source of energy for life on Earth The Sun, they unified as one and presented us their bonafide public with a dish best served on a turntable, in a superb

Track list of sound:
Amon (See No Evil), Predator, Daylight, Should I Stay or Should I Go, Look into My Eyes, Can You Feel The Love, Peaceful Demonstration, Build Mamma Africa, I Can’t Breath, In the City, bonus track Thinking out Loud.

Here we have eleven self-explanatory musical master-piece tracks which will prove without a shadow of a doubt who these very import components to the world and science of Roots Rock Reggae Music are.

As they embark on their second courageous World Tour called: "A Peaceful Demonstration" Where they will share with the world what they have researched and discovered about the ever growing sound of BLACK SLATE in A Peaceful Demonstration



Read more

Black Slate live on stage, with Should I go or should I stay and Boom Boom
(expired link)

Read more

Dear Black Slate Fans,
The band has returned to London following the second leg of their USA tour from The Austin Reggae Festival in Texas through a return to the Dub Club Los Angeles & Kingston 11 Restaurant & Rum Bar in Oakland, California with several stops in between. Black Slate wishes to thank the venues and audiences who came out to support them.

The band were given a wonderful Texas reception from Angela Tharpe of The Flamingo Cantina & Austin Reggae Festival which in addition to Black Slate, the lineup included New Kingston Band, The Skatalites, Lee "Scratch" Perry and King Yellowman to name a few. Prior to their scheduled day, they did a warm up show in San Antonio Texas to a lively crowd. Alas, the well-known Texas rains and floods came down which caused a cancellation on the day the band was supposed to play. Nevertheless, the band carried on the next day, performing at the excellent Flamingo Cantina to a fantastic crowd for a splendid 420 celebration show!

Founding Fathers Anthony, Desmond, & Chris along with Vocalist Jesse Brade and session bassist Andrew Emer traveled to California where their performances were very well received. Black Slate continues to blaze a trail with their smoking hot UK Roots, Dub & Lovers Rock sound as they are planning for European dates and another return to the States soon come.

They are still recording and the world will see a new single from them very soon---a cover of The Clash tune "Should I Stay Or Should I Go" for the Specialized UK project.

In the meantime, keep checking here, their facebook pages and (expired link) for upcoming info. Don't forget, you can listen to Black Slate now on the Pandora Radio App too!

Cheers,
Black Slate

Read more



This is Anthony from Black Slate talking to John Masouri for Reggae Vibes, i hope you enjoy the read.

“How long have you waited for Black Slate?” asked the MC who introduced them at last year’s Sierra Nevada World Music Festival. Hype comes with the territory but the guy wasn’t joking when he called it “an historical moment.”
That was only their third gig since reforming three years ago, after most of the original band members had gathered to celebrate their 40th Anniversary. They’ve been touring America’s West Coast since then, with dates in Brazil, the Caribbean and the US to come. Whilst they’re missing lead singer Keith Drummond and bassist Ras Elroy Bailey, the others are still there – most importantly drummer Desmond Mahoney, lead guitarist Chris Hanson and Anthony Brightly, his keyboards slung round his neck just like Herbie Hancock. These three were the nucleus of the band in any case and that’s where the band’s USP resides – in a blend of sounds, melodies and production style, rather than a single lead voice.
“The first Black Slate record was made in 1972, when I was still at school,” says Anthony, who was born in North London to Caribbean parents. “I saved some money and asked Keith to sing for me. He came to my house and we rehearsed this song Mix Up Man, then he came to the studio with me. It was just the two of us and some friends from school. This was before I met Chris and Desmond.”
Anthony had played organ with the house band at Phoebes in Hackney from the age of eleven. They played talent competitions before regularly backing visiting Jamaican stars.
“We played with Ken Boothe, Leroy Smart, Roy Shirley, Owen Gray and Dennis Brown... If you were a Jamaican artist who came to London back then, Black Slate would back you. We knew all the hit reggae songs like the back of our hands.
“We were called the Young Ones at first. We had that name until I was about fourteen, and then we changed it to Black Slate. We used “slate” because we’d seen the writing the wall, whereas “black” referred to us as a people. We always said that we’d make music that carried a message because Desmond and I had seen the Wailers play at the Sundown Theatre and that show changed our lives!”
It was time to get serious, which meant making records. The earliest Black Slate releases started out as dub plates for Anthony’s sound-system Sir George, which he inherited from his father.
“We played at the Club Noriek with Fatman and he annihilated us. That’s when I went into the studio and cut some tracks. I couldn’t afford to buy dubs from Jamaica so I had to make them. Before Sticks Man we recorded a song called Live Up To Love, and then we booked Island studios for Lay Your Head On My Shoulder and another attempt at Mix Up Man, which came out on the King George label. All the others came out on the Black Slate label.”
Sticks Man was their breakthrough hit in 1976. It was a No. 1 hit on the Black Echoes reggae charts for weeks and an update on the rude boy theme, or so we thought.
“It was written about a girl being spoilt, and telling people what they should and shouldn’t do,” says Anthony. “It was originally an instrumental. I made Piano Twist, Sticks Man and Suzy Wong all at the same time, for the sound-system. Then after I had an argument with this girl I went back and recorded Sticks Man, after I’d wiped the melodica from the original version.
“Elroy voiced it for me and I paid him for doing it. Every morning after that my dad would say, ‘what about this record?’ He wanted me to release Sticks Man but it was carrying the sound.”
The success of Sticks Man was followed by band’s debut album Black Slate, which they released on the TCD label, jointly owned by Tony (Anthony), Chris and Desmond. This trio handled production between them – they even paid for the sessions – although Keith Desmond wrote most of the songs. Key tracks included Freedom Time, Sticks Man and Reggae Music. All were guaranteed crowd-pleasers, whilst Mind Your Motion was cut in a late rockers style that Anthony describes as “straight Channel One.” Twelve months later and Amigo went Top 10 in the UK.
“I’d made it to play on the sound,” he says of Black Slate’s most successful hit. “It’s a Rasta song, and yet very commercial as well. We wanted to put people into a trance and that’s what it did. It put us in every club in England. Not even Matumbi could get the bookings we did.”
It was their unique brew of reggae, jazz and pop that made Black Slate different from other British reggae bands of that era. They could drop heavy roots with the best of them, but there was a sophistication to what they were doing that betrayed the influence of Jamaican producers like Lloyd Charmers and Derrick Harriott, who mixed a little soul with their reggae. The selectors on Sir George favoured a similar approach, and had London crowds queuing round the block circa 1978-80.
“We created this go-between,” Anthony explains. “We were a merge of two kinds of music and that’s where lovers’ rock came from. We were the first sound to play Silly Games and I’m So Sorry. When I finished with crowds back then, they left the dance making babies!”
Phonogram subsidiary Ensign Records signed Black Slate for the Amigo single and album. The latter featured a changed line-up from that debut TCD set, with the more uncompromising roots and reality songs having gone AWOL. Yet another version of it – omitting some of the more commercial tracks – appeared on Alligator Records in the US, just as Black Slate embarked on their first UK tour. The follow-up to Amigo was Boom Boom, which flopped. Not many black acts got back-to-back hits in those days, except for their stable-mate Eddy Grant. Freedom Time might have been a better choice with its molten harmonies – even their cover of the Persuaders’ Thin Love Between Love And Hate, which was another sumptuous fusion of reggae and soul. TCD issued a dub companion to Amigo called Ogima (“Amigo” spelt backwards), after Ensign declined to release it. Shame, because it underlined just how imaginative Black Slate could be given the opportunity.
“Ensign wanted to put us with a producer for the second album but we said, ‘Why? We can do it ourselves.’ Keith and Elroy finished the album themselves, with little help from the others but Ensign turned it down. That’s when the band went back into the studio for Sirens Of The City, which pulled no punches either lyrically or musically. Racial tension provided the backdrop. Britain’s black communities were feeling the pressure as Thatcherism tightened its grip and there would be no second-guessing when it came to tracks like Message To Mr. SUS Man and Dread In The House.
Black Slate regularly played benefit shows for the Anti-Nazi League and Rock Against Racism during that period, and often appeared on the same bill as 2 Tone and punk bands such as the Jam, Boomtown Rats and Generation X. They were doing well, but then split after Keith and Elroy refused to go on a first US tour supporting the Police, on racial and financial grounds. Steel Pulse took their place, whilst Black Slate headed for New Zealand and a major fall-out.
Brightly reacted by issuing a slew of the band’s material on the TCD and Top Ranking labels, as if searching for cathartic relief. In 1982 he launched the Sir George label and released two Black Slate songs – Tears On My Pillow (with the Chosen Few) and Wiser Than Before – before producing hits by Raymond Naptali, Sharon Edward, Winston Clark and Trevor Hartley. Wiser Than Before would eventually resurface on the Black Slate album from 1985. Delroy Pinnock deputised for Keith Drummond on tracks like Your Love, Brutality, No Justice For the Poor and Incidents, which Brightly had written about the race riots that had recently turned many UK inner city areas into war zones. The band undertook a short European tour behind this album, which they would later reissue as Midnight, complete with bonus tracks. This burst of activity proved a false dawn. Anthony returned to running nightclubs in Dalston and Hackney, built a studio and continued his experiments with soul and reggae on records by Pure Silk, Wendy Walker and Winsome. Black Slate’s current bass player Colin “Steam Fish” McNeil often joined him on these sessions. Brightly also teamed up with Stone Love, “the biggest sound-system in the world” for a string of album releases and live performances including 2014’s World Cup Clash, which was watched by two million people via live streaming, and twenty thousand at the actual venue.
He’d long stopped producing music by then, and turned his attention to social issues affecting his North London neighbourhood, like youth unemployment and police harassment.
“I wanted to get involved in politics but I could see that I was going to get diluted so I needed to have a voice in a different way,” he explains. A Scotland Yard initiative called Trident, aimed at fostering relations with the black community, was launched in one of his nightclubs.
“We wrote the protocol for how the police are supposed to deal with black people,” he continues. “I closed my club from Monday to Thursday after that and ran it as a school called PROMPT.”
Anthony moved to Antigua after a while, but the school’s still operational. Chris Hanson had opened a pressing plant called Music House in the meantime. He and Anthony certainly didn’t reform Black Slate for lack of anything to do! It was that 40th Anniversary show and also a trial session at Unit 8 studios in Hackney that rekindled their passion. Desmond had previously cut an album there with Elroy called World Citizen, but the magic didn’t really happen until Brightly and Hanson joined the fun.
“We’d been asking ourselves, ‘Are we fooling ourselves here or do we really have it?’ We did four tracks that day – Bu’n I Herb, Lions Den, Almost Lost My Mind and What’s The Reason – and it was all there, just like always. We were so tight, yet we hadn’t played together for over fifteen years!”
You can hear those tracks – together with a cover of Marley’s Redemption Song – on a new album called Now And Then that’s due out in spring 2015. By then, they also hope to be touring Europe, where they’re planning to “make a statement.
“A lot of reggae shows are programmed these days, but you won’t find Black Slate doing that,” says Anthony. “I don’t want to be playing the same thing as you can hear on the records. That spontaneity is what makes it exciting. It’s what gives me energy when I’m on stage because when we play, anything is possible and that’s what makes the difference.”

thank you for your time

Read more

Past Events

Fri
Aug 14
8:00pm
18+
Fri
Mar 18
8:00pm
All Ages
Sun
Apr 17
4:00pm
All Ages
Thu
Apr 21
8:30pm
All Ages
Fri
Apr 22
8:00pm
All Ages
Mon
Jun 17
8:00pm
18+
Sat
Jul 06
1:30pm
All Ages
Thu
Sep 26
8:00pm
18+
363806
363845
364682
364688
509565
518219
:blush: :scream: :smirk: :smiley: :stuck_out_tongue_closed_eyes: :stuck_out_tongue_winking_eye: :rage: :disappointed: :sob: :kissing_heart: :wink: :pensive: :confounded: :flushed: :relaxed: :mask: :heart: :broken_heart: :expressionless: :sweat: :weary: :triumph: :cry: :sleepy:

#title

#text

#title

#text


Please wait. Verifying...